Friday eXcursion: Supreme League of Patriots


Supreme League of Patriots, from indie developers No Bull Intentions, is an entertaining point-and-click adventure centered around the world of superheroes. Episodic in nature, with three episodes in total, Supreme League of Patriots charts the journey of one Kyle Keever, a slobbish oaf with a dream of becoming a reality TV star. Players are invited to lead Kyle through his transformation into ultra-conservative superhero, the Purple Patriot.

The game begins in Kyle’s apartment, which he shares with his highly cynical British sidekick, Mel. The ‘America’s Got Superpowers’ talent contest are but a few hours away and Kyle’s outfit has come out not quite right. Through the simple point-and-click interface and highly entertaining, engaging dialogue, players will discover the background of the Purple Patriot and have a blast as the story unfolds before them.


The Purple Patriot?

Supreme League of Patriots is first and foremost satire. The story doesn’t hold back in its parodies, off-the-wall humor, or tropes with regards to everything from conservatism to video game culture. Best of all, the game doesn’t take itself seriously. Within the first few minutes of playing, a witty dialogue takes place between Kyle and Mel poking fun at the very game itself – a point-and-click adventure that, in the fashion of the typical trope, should be replete with ridiculously complex puzzles, repetitive gameplay and uninspired characters.

Instead, Supreme League of Patriots is a refreshing take on the genre and blends simplistic gameplay with dollops of humor to make what is really very entertaining game, albeit a little on the short side. Mechanically, the gameplay is your typical point-and-click affair, as can be expected, that doesn’t introduce any groundbreaking new styles or strategies to play. The puzzles are all relatively short and fairly easy to figure out. Even if the player becomes stuck, handy sidekick Mel always has available hints and tips to go about finding a solution. The graphics and sound fit the flavor of the title, and the voice acting is exceptionally well done and plays a big role in how well executed the dialogue is in the game.


Good, funny writing abound!

Speaking of dialogue, here we find the game’s true bread and butter. If anything, Supreme League of Patriots plays as much like a story-driven adventure game as it does a traditional point-and-click. Credit goes to both the writers and the voice actors for delivering scene after scene with hilarity, if occasionally somewhat obscure and repetitive. If you’re looking for a true puzzle solver, Supreme League of Patriots just doesn’t fit the bill. As noted, the puzzles really don’t present a great deal of challenge or require a lot of logical thinking (sometimes the opposite!). Instead, the game relies on players being willing to listen to the sometimes lengthy dialogue taking place to immerse themselves in the Purple Patriot’s world.

Despite poking fun at other point-and-click titles, with their annoying mini-games, Supreme League of Patriots is not without a few faults of its own.


Your inventory screen looks like an inventory screen.

Firstly, although the puzzles are relatively easy to figure out in the game, some progression requires the player complete steps in a sequence that isn’t always clear. For example, there may be puzzles/plot points that can’t be solved or advanced, until the player has spoken to another character. Of course, the player might be totally unaware of this other character and waste time in frustration trying to complete a task that simply won’t complete until the sequence conditions have been met. The game, as noted, is dialogue-heavy which can be a good thing at times, but highly irritating at others. Almost every item or person has a lengthy amount of reading attached to it and, as you work out solutions, re-visiting locations/characters/items can become tedious when forced to click through multiple text boxes every time.

The other frustration that I have with Supreme League of Patriots is in the inventory system. For reasons unknown, the game utilizes two separate screens for player inventory. Some tasks, such as opening or combining items, can be accomplished from one screen, while actually using the item is accomplished from another. Ultimately, this ends up feeling unnecessary and clunky during gameplay, taking away a tad from the otherwise immersive feel of the interface.


Woah, comrade! Didn’t you just “flip the script”? Whatever that means…

Exploring the world around Kyle is achieved in much the same fashion as any other point-and-click. Clicking on a highlighted object reveals a choice wheel with, most typically, the examine or use options. Clicking on either choice usually results in humor-laden dialogue to click through which, as I mentioned, can be hilarious at some points, and truly bothersome at other. Ultimately, players need to ask themselves the question: how much do I love dialogue? If the answer is “a lot,” then Supreme League of Patriots certainly has it covered.

Dialogue and inventorying aside, Supreme League of Patriots is very much what you’d expect from an adventure game. A helpful task list makes sure you always know what you’re supposed to be doing to advance the plot, and the cheerful graphics and music make for a nice, uplifting (albeit sarcastic) storyline.


At the end of the day, No Bull Intentions has done a really nice job creating a humorous take on the point-and-click adventure and it’ll definitely be interesting to see how this studio progresses in the future. They’re currently working on a crime puzzle solver titled Criminal Investigations: With Woman’s Tears which, if it can match SLoP’s immersive storytelling, might persuade me that point-and-click is no longer a genre of a bygone age. For now, though, if you’re a fan of dialogue-heavy stories and trope-laden sarcastic asides, then Supreme League of Patriots might be worth your time.

The Friday eXcursion is a feature we have every other Friday where we move away from our chosen genre and look at some games that just appear to be plain ol’ fun!

Categories: eXcursions

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